Practice Areas

Los Angeles Premises Liability Attorney

You have every right to a safe environment while on someone else’s property. Unfortunately, many people are seriously injured or killed in accidents every year in residential properties, commercial properties, restaurants, shopping malls, public buildings, recreational facilities, etc.

If you or a loved one has been seriously injured on the property or premises of another party due to their negligence, you might be entitled to compensation.

Cohen & Marzban is one of the top Los Angeles premises liability attorney firms.

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We help clients who suffered serious injuries in an accident that occured on another party’s property or premises, due to the negligence of that party, to receive the compensation they deserve. Serious injuries often include:

As a result, the injured party may suffer:

With over 45 years of experience, Cohen & Marzban has already recovered $2,000,000,000+ for our clients. Our track record speaks for itself.

24 Hours a Day, 7 Days a Week To Schedule an Appointment.

Let us know if you’re unable to travel to our office. We’ll gladly send one of our premises liability lawyers to visit you at home or in hospital, anywhere in Southern California.

Why Choose Cohen & Marzban Personal Injury Attorneys?

Results! Results! Results!

With over 45 years of experience, we have already recovered $2,000,000,000+ for our clients!

Our list of accomplishments includes winning The Litigator Award™ – an honor given to only the top 1% of trial attorneys in the United States.

If you need a respected law firm with a proven track record on your side, Cohen & Marzban is the place to go. We stand ready to help you.

All new clients receive a free consultation and if we decide to take on your case, we don’t get paid unless you get paid!

Frequently Asked Questions

What does california law say about premises liability?

California Civil Code 1714 deals with obligations imposed by the law.

1714(a): “Everyone is responsible, not only for the result of his or her willful acts, but also for an injury occasioned to another by his or her want of ordinary care or skill in the management of his or her property or person, except so far as the latter has, willfully or by want of ordinary care, brought the injury upon himself or herself.”

Take note of the phrase “want of ordinary care or skill” – it refers to the doctrine of negligence that goes together with a party’s duty of care. The exception is when the injured party is responsible for his or her injury.

1714(c): “Except as provided in subdivision (d), no social host who furnishes alcoholic beverages to any person may be held legally accountable for damages suffered by that person, or for injury to the person or property of, or death of, any third person, resulting from the consumption of those beverages.”

1714(d) (1) “Nothing in subdivision (c) shall preclude a claim against a parent, guardian, or another adult who knowingly furnishes alcoholic beverages at his or her residence to a person whom he or she knows, or should have known, to be under 21 years of age, in which case, notwithstanding subdivision (b), the furnishing of the alcoholic beverage may be found to be the proximate cause of resulting injuries or death.”

As stipulated above, a host that provides alcoholic beverages to someone cannot be held accountable for damages or injuries to that person or any third party. The exception is when that person is under 21 years of age. 

CACI No. 1001. Basic Duty of Care (Judicial Council of California Civil Jury Instructions) mentions factors a jury should consider to determine if a defendant exercised reasonable care:

A person who [owns/leases/occupies/controls] property is negligent if that person fails to use reasonable care to keep the property in a reasonably safe condition. A person who [owns/leases/occupies/controls] property must use reasonable care to discover any unsafe conditions and to repair, replace, or give adequate warning of anything that could be reasonably expected to harm others.

In deciding whether [name of defendant] used reasonable care, you may consider, among other factors, the following:

  • The location of the property;
  • The likelihood that someone would come on to the property in the same manner as [name of plaintiff] did;
  • The likelihood of harm;
  • The probable seriousness of such harm;
  • Whether [name of defendant] knew or should have known of the condition that created the risk of harm;
  • The difficulty of protecting against the risk of such harm; [and]
  • The extent of [name of defendant]’s control over the condition that created the risk of harm; [and]
  1. [Other relevant factor(s).]

Note: Many other factors might be relevant in a premises liability claim. For example, trespassers can typically not file a premises liability claim. However, if the trespasser was a minor, the same rules might not apply.

Contact a premises liability attorney at Cohen & Marzban for a detailed review of your case.

What damages can I claim for my injuries?

The damages you might be able to recover can typically be separated into noneconomic and economic damages.

Noneconomic damages include:

  • Pain and suffering
  • Mental anguish
  • Loss of quality of life
  • Disfigurement

Economic damages include:

  • Emergency treatment
  • Current and future medical bills
  • Physical therapy
  • Lost wages and future loss of earnings

In certain cases, you might also be able to recover punitive damages such as where the other party is guilty of gross negligence.

An experienced premises liability lawyer will be able to provide you with more information on what damages you should be able to recover based on your unique case.

How long do I have to file a personal injury claim in california?

It’s always advisable to contact a personal injury attorney to file a premises liability claim as soon as possible after an accident. It’s much easier to collect evidence, witness statements, etc. for a recent event than one that occurred a couple of months before.

The California statute of limitations for personal injury claims is two years as per California Code of Civil Procedure, Section 335.1. that states:

“Within two years: An action for assault, battery, or injury to, or for the death of, an individual caused by the wrongful act or neglect of another.”

Note that certain exceptions may apply, such as when your claim is against a government entity or the person who suffered injuries is a minor.

For the best advice and guidance, always discuss your case with an experienced premises liability lawyer.

Don’t hesitate to call Cohen & Marzban now at (310) 880-4555 if you have any questions. We are ready to assist you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.